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Chernobyl 30 years after

The "Russian Woodpecker", an advanced Soviet radio weapon, stands near the decommissioned Chernobyl power station reactor number 4. <br />
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Дуга-3 (Duga-3) was a Soviet over-the-horizon (OTH) radar system used as part of the Soviet ABM early-warning network. The system operated from July 1976 to December 1989. Two operational Duga radars were deployed, one near Chernobyl and Chernihiv in what was then called the Ukrainian SSR (present-day Ukraine), the other in eastern Siberia.<br />
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The Duga systems were extremely powerful, over 10 MW in some cases, and broadcast in the shortwave radio bands. They appeared without warning, sounding like a sharp, repetitive tapping noise at 10 Hz,[1] which led to it being nicknamed by shortwave listeners the Russian Woodpecker. The random frequency hops disrupted legitimate broadcast, amateur radio, commercial aviation communications, utility transmissions, and resulted in thousands of complaints by many countries worldwide. <br />
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30 years on, the Chernobyl power plant is still heavily contaminated, unfit for human life. <br />
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The Chernobyl nuclear disaster happened on 26 April 1986.
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Slavutych town in Chernobyl's shadow
The "Russian Woodpecker", an advanced Soviet radio weapon, stands near the decommissioned Chernobyl power station reactor number 4.

Дуга-3 (Duga-3) was a Soviet over-the-horizon (OTH) radar system used as part of the Soviet ABM early-warning network. The system operated from July 1976 to December 1989. Two operational Duga radars were deployed, one near Chernobyl and Chernihiv in what was then called the Ukrainian SSR (present-day Ukraine), the other in eastern...
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Filename: Chernobyl 069.jpg
From gallery: Chernobyl 30 years after
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Date: 29 Mar 2016
Location: Slavutych Ukraine
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